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Academy of Ancient Music

When Mar 24, 2014
from 07:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Where 7.30pm, West Road Concert Hall
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Kirchschlager sings Arias and Lieder by Haydn and Mozart

JC Bach Grand Overture in B flat major (c.1782)
Mozart Lieder ‘Abendempfindung’ (1787), ‘Das Veilchen’ (1785) and ‘Als Luise die Briefe’ (1787)
WFE Bach Sinfonia in C major (c.1798)
Haydn Scena di Berenice(1795)
JCF Bach Concerto in E flat major for fortepiano and obbligato viola(c .1790)
Mozart Concert arias ‘Ch’io mi scordi di te’ (1786),‘Alma grande e nobil core’ (1789) and ‘Al desio di chi t’adora’ (1789)

Richard Egarr, director & fortepiano
Angelika Kirchschlager, mezzo-soprano
Jane Rogers, viola

Austrian mezzo-soprano Angelika Kirchschlager joins us for a performance of the recital and operatic music for which she has gained worldwide admiration. Kirchschlager sings a rich selection of vocal music, beginning with three Mozart lieder whose intimate introspection would inspire Schumann and Schubert. Mozart and Haydn also explored the colourful potential of opera, and – alongside three Mozart concert arias – at the heart of the programme stands Haydn’s remarkable Scena di Berenice, a ten-minute operatic scene telling a tragic tale of lost love. Haydn wrote this masterpiece for a London audience, and music by two generations of Bachs with connections to the capital intersperses the programme. The night begins with an Overture by the ‘London Bach’, Johann Christian, followed by a rare chance to hear the Concerto for fortepiano and viola by his brother JCF. Wilhelm Friedrich Ernst (grandson of Johann Sebastian) was the last of the Bach dynasty to take up composing – and was a passing acquaintance of Robert Schumann, who was so influenced by Mozart and Haydn.

Free AAM Explore pre-concert talk at 6.30pm, hosted by Sandy Burnett (writer and broadcaster).

TICKETS £14–£27 (£3 for AAMplify members) available from Cambridge Corn Exchange. Box office tel: 01223 357851; email:; online: or from

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