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Colloquia Michaelmas Term 2017

The Colloquium series is the main opportunity for members of the Faculty of Music, researchers from other departments, and the general public to come together and hear papers on all aspects of music research, given by distinguished speakers from the UK and abroad. Colloquia are held on Wednesday evenings in the Recital Room of the Faculty of Music, West Road. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please arrive at 4.50pm for a 5.00pm start. Papers are followed by a discussion and a drinks reception with the speaker.

 

Wednesday, 4 October 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Peter McMurray
University of Cambridge

Orality 3.0; or Siri, can you beatbox?

 

Wednesday, 11 October 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Philip Bullock
University of Oxford

‘I almost always know how much money I have’: Chaikovsky and the Market for Classical Music in Nineteenth-Century Russia

 

Wednesday, 18 October 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Rachel Harris
SOAS, University of London

Musical Border-Crossing Projects along the Silk Road: Listening Publics and Groove

 

Wednesday, 25 October 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Valeria De Lucca
University of Southampton

 

Wednesday, 1 November 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Shay Loya
City University of London

Hybrid Topics and Allusions in Liszt’s Csárdás macabre

 

Wednesday, 8 November 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Tim Summers
University of Oxford

Opera in video games

 

Wednesday, 15 November 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Matthew Head & Esther Cavett
King’s College London

Howard Skempton, composer: narratives and reflections

 

Wednesday, 22 November 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Katherine Hambridge
Durham University

 

Wednesday, 29 November 2017
5.00pm, Recital Room at the Faculty of Music

Julian Johnson
Royal Holloway University of London

Debussy, La Mer, and the Aesthetics of Appearing